View Category: Nonfiction

Photo Name/Description Status
Image A Queer Reader
(373 Pages) A Queer Reader is a rich collection of quotes and short excerpts about the gay experience through the centuries, from Plato to Andy Warhol. Arranged chronologically and drawing on sources from Michelangelo's sonnets to a speech in the House of Lords, from graphic graffiti found in Pompeii to a Playboy interview with David Bowie, A Queer Reader presents gay history as never before.
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Image Ahora que ya lo sabes: todo lo que me hubiera gustado saber antes de salir del armario
(248 Pages)
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Image Always My Child: A Parent's Guide to Understanding Your Gay, Lesbian, Bisexual, Transgendered, Or Questioning Son Or Daughter
(323 Pages) Offers advice and support for parents with adolescents dealing with sexual identity, personal confusion, bigotry, tension, and other challenges of being gay, lesbian, bisexual, or transgendered.
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Image And the Band Played on: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
(640 Pages) An examination of the AIDS crisis exposes the federal government for its inaction, health authorities for their greed, and scientists for their desire for prestige in the face of the AIDS pandemic
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Image Are You My Mother?: A Comic Drama
(304 Pages) The New York Times–bestselling graphic memoir about Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home, becoming the artist her mother wanted to be. Alison Bechdel’s Fun Home was a pop culture and literary phenomenon. Now, a second thrilling tale of filial sleuthery, this time about her mother: voracious reader, music lover, passionate amateur actor. Also a woman, unhappily married to a closeted gay man, whose artistic aspirations simmered under the surface of Bechdel's childhood…and who stopped touching or kissing her daughter good night, forever, when she was seven. Poignantly, hilariously, Bechdel embarks on a quest for answers concerning the mother-daughter gulf. It's a richly layered search that leads readers from the fascinating life and work of the iconic twentieth-century psychoanalyst Donald Winnicott, to one explosively illuminating Dr. Seuss illustration, to Bechdel’s own (serially monogamous) adult love life. And, finally, back to Mother—to a truce, fragile and real-time, that will move and astonish all adult children of gifted mothers. A New York Times, USA Today, Time, Slate, and Barnes & Noble Best Book of the Year “As complicated, brainy, inventive and satisfying as the finest prose memoirs.”—New York Times Book Review “A work of the most humane kind of genius, bravely going right to the heart of things: why we are who we are. It's also incredibly funny. And visually stunning. And page-turningly addictive. And heartbreaking.”—Jonathan Safran Foer “Many of us are living out the unlived lives of our mothers. Alison Bechdel has written a graphic novel about this; sort of like a comic book by Virginia Woolf. You won't believe it until you read it—and you must!”—Gloria Steinem
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Image Asexuality: A Brief Introduction
(136 Pages) Sometimes called “A Fourth Orientation”, asexuality is a sexual orientation characterized by a persistent lack of sexual attraction toward any gender. This book explores love, sex, and life, from the asexual point of view.This book is for anyone, regardless of orientation. Whether you're asexual, think you might be, know someone who is, or just want to learn more about what asexuality is (and isn't), there's something inside for you.This is one of the first books exclusively dedicated to the subject of asexuality as a sexual orientation. Written by an asexual, it discusses the topic from the inside.
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Image Beautiful Bottom, Beautiful Shame: Where “Black” Meets “Queer”
(271 Pages) DIVThe relationship between black queer subjects and debasement as portrayed within popular culture texts and films./div
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Image Becoming a Woman: A Biography of Christine Jorgensen
(301 Pages) A fascinating biography of the highly-publicized male-to-female sex change recipient, Christine Jorgensen, and the impact she had on changing attitudes toward gays, lesbians, bisexuals, and transgendered persons.
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Image Beyond Magenta: Transgender Teens Speak Out
(182 Pages) Shares insights into the teen transgender experience, tracing six individual's emotional and physical journey as it was shaped by family dynamics, living situations, and the transition each teen made during the personal journey.
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Image Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity
(256 Pages) The story of Christine Jorgensen, America's first prominent transsexual, famously narrated trans embodiment in the postwar era. Her celebrity, however, has obscured other mid-century trans narratives--ones lived by African Americans such as Lucy Hicks Anderson and James McHarris. Their erasure from trans history masks the profound ways race has figured prominently in the construction and representation of transgender subjects. In Black on Both Sides, C. Riley Snorton identifies multiple intersections between blackness and transness from the mid-nineteenth century to present-day anti-black and anti-trans legislation and violence. Drawing on a deep and varied archive of materials--early sexological texts, fugitive slave narratives, Afro-modernist literature, sensationalist journalism, Hollywood films--Snorton attends to how slavery and the production of racialized gender provided the foundations for an understanding of gender as mutable. In tracing the twinned genealogies of blackness and transness, Snorton follows multiple trajectories, from the medical experiments conducted on enslaved black women by J. Marion Sims, the "father of American gynecology," to the negation of blackness that makes transnormativity possible. Revealing instances of personal sovereignty among blacks living in the antebellum North that were mapped in terms of "cross dressing" and canonical black literary works that express black men's access to the "female within," Black on Both Sides concludes with a reading of the fate of Phillip DeVine, who was murdered alongside Brandon Teena in 1993, a fact omitted from the film Boys Don't Cry out of narrative convenience. Reconstructing these theoretical and historical trajectories furthers our imaginative capacities to conceive more livable black and trans worlds.
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Image Born This Way: Real Stories of Growing Up Gay
(128 Pages) Sure to become a modern LGBTQ+ pride classic, this “amazing” celebration of the pains and joys of growing up gay features personal stories from around the world (The Huffington Post) Based on the hugely popular blog of the same name, Born This Way shares 100 different memories of growing up LGBTQ+. Childhood photographs are accompanied by sweet, funny—and at times, heartbreaking—personal stories. Collected from around the world and dating from the 1940s to today, these memories speak to the hardships of an unaccepting world and the triumph of pride, self-love, and self-acceptance. This intimate little book is a wonderful gift for all members of the LGBTQ+ community as well as their friends and families. Like Dan Savage’s It Gets Better Project, Born This Way gives young people everywhere the courage to say, “Yes, I’m gay. And I was born this way. I’ve known it since I was very young, and this is my story.”
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Image Boy Erased: A Memoir
(340 Pages) "A poignant account by a survivor of a church-supported sexual orientation conversion therapy facility that claimed to "cure" homosexuality describes its intense Bible study program and the daily threats of his abandonment by family, friends and God, an experience that transformed the author's relationships and self-understandings, "--NoveList.
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Image Boys Like Us: Gay Writers Tell Their Coming Out Stories
(365 Pages) Twenty-eight of the nation's most-admired gay writers, including Edmund White, Alan Gurganus, and Andrew Holleran, along with rising talents, present never-before-published tales of their coming out, spanning the years 1949 to 1995. 25,000 first printing.
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Image Butch Is a Noun
(223 Pages) Butch is a Noun was a critical and commercial success when first published in 2006: a funny, insightful manifesto on what it means to be butch. Irreverent, tender, funny, difficult and sexy, Butch is a Noun is a narrative about growing-up and coming-out butch, wrestling and embracing it and then wrestling with it some more. This is a story of butch in its best and worst moments, about butch in the context of femme, butch in the orbit of another butch and butch trying to stand alone, sometimes bravely and sometimes foolishly, sometimes successfully and sometimes fatally.
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Image Charity and Sylvia: A Same-sex Marriage in Early America
(267 Pages) Charity and Sylvia is the intimate history of the extraordinary marriage of two ordinary early American women. Their story, drawn from the women's personal writings and other original documents, reveals that same-sex marriage is not as new as we think.
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Image Chronicle of a Plague, Revisited: AIDS and Its Aftermath
(264 Pages) Discusses the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, emphasizing the impact the epidemic had on the gay male population in New York City, and the sudden resurgence of AIDS cases in that same community today.
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Image Coming Out Under Fire
(384 Pages) Among the many histories of fighting men and women in World War II, little has been written about the thousands of homosexuals who found themselves fighting two wars--one for their country, the other for their own survival as targets of a military policy that sought their discharge as "undesirables." To write this long overdue chapter of American history, Allan Bérubé spent ten years interviewing gay and lesbian veterans, unearthed hundreds of wartime letters between gay GIs, and obtained thousands of pages of newly declassified government documents. While some gay and lesbian soldiers collapsed under the fear of being arrested, interrogated, discharged, and publicly humiliated, many drew strength from deep wartime friendships. Relying on their own secret culture of slang, body language, and "camp" to find each other and build spontaneous communities, they learned, both on and off the battlefield, to be proud of their contribution and of who they were.--From publisher description.
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Image Conduct Unbecoming: Lesbians and Gays in the U.S. Military : Vietnam to the Persian Gulf
(784 Pages) There is a country where citizens are interrogated for long hours and threatened with prison or the loss of their children if they do not cooperate, where citizens are ordered to denounce others, to give information - often entirely fabricated - dispatching people to ignominy and jail. And if they refuse, they are threatened with prison. This country is America, and the subjects under attack are people who have chosen to serve their nation. They are military personnel. They are lesbians and gay men. And they are hunted day in and day out. Author Randy Shilts follows his best-seller And the Band Played On with a book of even greater power and sweep, as he investigates the situation of lesbians and gays in the military over the past three decades, revealing for the first time that some of the most celebrated soldiers in American history were homosexual (including the Father of the United States Army). Five years of interviews with nearly 1,100 gay service people have uncovered extraordinary stories of heroism, persecution, and increasing resistance while documenting the creation of a vast gay subculture within the armed forces. With thousands of documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, Shilts offers the first in-depth look at the behind-the-scenes decision-making that resulted in the fierce purges of gays in the military over the past thirty years. With its epic scope this book will provide the basis of a national debate not only on the issue of lesbians and gays in the military but on the broader issue of the place of homosexuals in American life.
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Image Contesting Intersex: The Dubious Diagnosis
(240 Pages) Watch Georgiann Davis in National Geographic's Gender Revolution documentary with Katie Couric A personal, compelling perspective on how medical diagnoses can profoundly hurt, or help, the lived experiences of entire communities Winner, 2016 Donald Light Award for the Applied or Public Practice of Medical Sociology, presented by the American Sociological Association When sociologist Georgiann Davis was a teenager, her doctors discovered that she possessed XY chromosomes, marking her as intersex. Rather than share this information with her, they withheld the diagnosis in order to “protect” the development of her gender identity; it was years before Davis would see her own medical records as an adult and learn the truth. Davis’ experience is not unusual. Many intersex people feel isolated from one another and violated by medical practices that support conventional notions of the male/female sex binary which have historically led to secrecy and shame about being intersex. Yet, the rise of intersex activism and visibility in the US has called into question the practice of classifying intersex as an abnormality, rather than as a mere biological variation. This shift in thinking has the potential to transform entrenched intersex medical treatment. In Contesting Intersex, Davis draws on interviews with intersex people, their parents, and medical experts to explore the oft-questioned views on intersex in medical and activist communities, as well as the evolution of thought in regards to intersex visibility and transparency. She finds that framing intersex as an abnormality is harmful and can alter the course of one’s life. In fact, controversy over this framing continues, as intersex has been renamed a ‘disorder of sex development’ throughout medicine. This happened, she suggests, as a means for doctors to reassert their authority over the intersex body in the face of increasing intersex activism in the 1990s and feminist critiques of intersex medical treatment. Davis argues the renaming of ‘intersex’ as a ‘disorder of sex development’ is strong evidence that the intersex diagnosis is dubious. Within the intersex community, though, disorder of sex development terminology is hotly disputed; some prefer not to use a term which pathologizes their bodies, while others prefer to think of intersex in scientific terms. Although terminology is currently a source of tension within the movement, Davis hopes intersex activists and their allies can come together to improve the lives of intersex people, their families, and future generations. However, for this to happen, the intersex diagnosis, as well as sex, gender, and sexuality, needs to be understood as socially constructed phenomena. A personal journey into medical and social activism, Contesting Intersex presents a unique perspective on how medical diagnoses can affect lives profoundly. Instructor's Guide Ask us about setting up a Skype-in with the author for your class
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Image Courting Equality: A Documentary History of America's First Legal Same-sex Marriages
(190 Pages) The inspiring story of America's only successful battle for gay marriage—the court cases, the protests, and finally, the weddings! On November 18, 2003, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court granted equal marriage benefits to same-sex couples. The decision provoked a searing public debate over the meaning of marriage and family, civil rights, and the role of religion in law and society. But the experiment went forward nonetheless: thousands of Massachusetts gays and lesbians married and, remarkably, the sky did not fall. Through engaging storytelling and powerful photographs, Courting Equality takes readers through the volatile public debate following the decision and introduces some of the many lesbian and gay families who have taken advantage of equal marriage laws. In Massachusetts, equal marriage has not destroyed the family but rather has reinforced the importance of love, commitment, fairness, and equality to the functioning of healthy democratic communities. A former professor of English and Women's Studies, Patricia A. Gozemba is the coauthor of Pockets of Hope: How Students and Teachers Change the World. She is also a founding member of The History Project, which has been documenting LGBT Boston since 1980. The former editor of Sojourner: The Women's Forum, Karen Kahn also edited Frontline Feminism: Essays from Sojourner's First Twenty Years. Gozemba and Kahn got married in September 2005; they live in Salem, Massachusetts. "Courting Equality offers timely and vivid testimony to the power of commitment. Gozemba and Kahn take great care in tracing the complex legal and legislative processes that resulted in the first legal same-sex weddings. These fascinating behind-the-scenes stories are valuable reminders that the profound historic events surrounding the Goodridge case were played out on an intimate, human scale, in the lives of real families. Marilyn Humphries' photographs are a gift to us all. They provide moving and eloquent documentation of each stage in the struggle to end discrimination in the Massachusetts marriage statutes. Courting Equality bears witness to the determination, the love, and, ultimately, the jubilation of thousands of ordinary people who believed in an extraordinary dream." —Rev. William G. Sinkford, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations "In Courting Equality, Marilyn Humphries' stunning photos show both what the struggle for equality looks like and what it feels like. She has been there every step of the way as this history has unfolded. She, Patricia Gozemba, and Karen Kahn have documented an important piece of American history and our national project of expanding fairness and ending discrimination. The more people get to know gay people, the more they support us, our families, and our rights. This book shows how some of our own legislators and fellow citizens got to know us and their journey to embracing fairness. Courting Equality will help others make that journey." —Mary L. Bonauto, Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, Lead counsel, Goodridge v. Department of Public Health "Courting Equality is a very important book on several levels. First, it chronicles the events that led up to same sex marriage in Massachusetts, an historic event in our country's move towards making the wonderful principles of the Constitution applicable to all of our citizens. Second, it shows how political support in the elected Legislature grew rapidly as the reality of allowing same sex couples to love each other demolished the prejudices that prevented same sex marriage previously. Finally, it reinforces the point—which was no surprise to those of us fighting for equal treatment for all people—that same sex marriage has been an entirely positive thing for thousands of men and women in Massachusetts, and has had zero negative consequences at all. Too often, political literature focuses on the bad news, Courting Equality tells some very good news very well." —Congressman Barney Frank "Courting Equality is a remarkable chronicle of exactly how social change happens. Marilyn Humpries'vivid photographic documentation of the fight for same-sex marriage hardly needs any elaboration, but Kahn's and Gozemba's accompanying legal history is riveting. Words and pictures together create a moving, human portrait of representative democracy at work." —Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home and Dykes to Watch Out For "Hopefully, MassEquality or some other such group will also distribute a copy of Beacon Press's newly published Courting Equality: A Documentary History of America's First Legal Same-Sex Marriage to every lawmaker. The book is an elegantly moving and gorgeously illustrated account of the battle for civil marriage rights here in Massachusetts." —Bay Windows, book mention in the May 3rd issue "For gay marriage boosters, to read "Courting Equality" is a literary experience of sheer ecstasy, a brief pause of unbridled joy in the ongoing - and by no means over - struggle to preserve and protect same-sex marriage. It's a delightful sneak peak over the rainbow." —In Newsweekly "The pictures of protests and rallies—both the pro and anti-forces swarming with energy—make you feel like you're witnessing a combination of the American Revolution and a sizzling Red Sox game. Marginalized no more, these gay couples (in both senses of the word) are photographed goin' to the chapel, hugging kids, looking joyful, homey, even rather Hallmark mainstream—at last." —Improper Bostonian Marilyn Humphries is an independent photojournalist whose work over the past twenty-five years has appeared in numerous publications, ranging from the New York Times and The Pro g ressive to Bay Windows, Gay Community News, and the Boston Phoenix. She lives in Beverly, Massachusetts.
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Image Deeper Than Swords
From the 2013 exhibit Deeper Than Swords at the Texas A&M Cushing Memorial Library & Archives, designed and fabricated by Todd Samuelson and Cait Coker: "Deeper Than Swords presents objects, editions, and manuscripts from the full scope of George R. R. Martin's career, from early letters and stories to his most recent writings. Major sections of the gallery will be devoted to the writing and reception of A Song of Ice and Fire, the range of his other novels and collaborations, and the international impact of Martin's work."
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Image Drag King Dreams
(302 Pages) A follow-up to Stone Butch Blues finds East Village bouncer-turned-bartender Max Rabinowitz struggling through a mid-life crisis in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, experiencing outrage at the wars in the Middle East, and rediscovering her activist spirit after the death of a cross-dresser friend. Original.
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Image Dry: A Memoir
(320 Pages) From the bestselling author of Running with Scissors comes Dry—the hilarious, moving, and no less bizarre account of what happened next. You may not know it, but you've met Augusten Burroughs. You've seen him on the street, in bars, on the subway, at restaurants: a twenty-something guy, nice suit, works in advertising. Regular. Ordinary. But when the ordinary person had to drinks, Augusten was circling the drain by having twelve; when the ordinary person went home at midnight, Augusten never went home at all. Loud, distracting ties, automated wake-up calls, and cologne on the tongue could only hide so much for so long. At the request (well, it wasn't really a request) of his employers, Augusten landed in rehab, where his dreams of group therapy with Robert Downey, Jr., are immediately dashed by the grim reality of fluorescent lighting and paper hospital slippers. But when Augusten is forced to examine himself, something actually starts to click, and that's when he finds himself in the worst trouble of all. Because when his thirty days are up, he has to return to his same drunken Manhattan life—and live it sober. What follows is a memoir that's as moving as it is funny, as heartbreaking as it is real. Dry is the story of love, loss, and Starbucks as a higher power.
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Image Eighteen
(240 Pages) eighteen by alberto ramos, is a journey of growth and becoming and it's divided into three parts. each part deals with a different stage, represented as the different cycles of the metamorphosis of a butterfly, and illustrated by the author. the ending as the larva, deals with abuse, homophobia, loss, bullying and suicide. the transition as the cocoon, explores self-discovery, healing, grieving, forgiveness, life and death. the beginning as the butterfly, is a celebration of one self and of the existing beauty in this world. it exudes love and power. joy and hope after the misery. alberto ramos was just fifteen when he moved from his hometown málaga spain to stockholm sweden and left his family and friends behind to join his bestfriend on their long-awaited international high school experience. little did he know what he thought would be the beginning was nothing but endings. eighteen is the journey since the ending until the beginning.
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Image Epistemology of the Closet: Updated with a New Preface
(258 Pages) Since the late 1980s, queer studies and theory have become vital to the intellectual and political life of the United States. This has been due, in no small degree, to the influence of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's critically acclaimed Epistemology of the Closet. Working from classic texts of European and American writers—including Melville, James, Nietzsche, Proust, and Wilde—Sedgwick analyzes a turn-of-the-century historical moment in which sexual orientation became as important a demarcation of personhood as gender had been for centuries. In her preface to this updated edition Sedgwick places the book both personally and historically, looking specifically at the horror of the first wave of the AIDS epidemic and its influence on the text.
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Image Estate Planning for Same-sex Couples
(199 Pages) The legal landscape concerning same-sex relationships is changing. It is vital for lawyers to stay on top of these changes. Attorneys who represent lesbian and gay clients must provide creative estate planning that protects both parties to the relationship, their children and their future. This new book provides estate planning lawyers with an introduction to the issues faced by lesbian and gay clients. Also provided are forms and documents on CD-ROM that lesbian and gay clients need to prepare as part of a complete estate plan.
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Image Female Husbands: A Trans History
(320 Pages) Long before people identified as transgender or lesbian, there were female husbands and the women who loved them. Female husbands - people assigned female who transed gender, lived as men, and married women - were true queer pioneers. Moving deftly from the colonial era to just before the First World War, Jen Manion uncovers the riveting and very personal stories of ordinary people who lived as men despite tremendous risk, danger, violence, and threat of punishment. Female Husbands weaves the story of their lives in relation to broader social, economic, and political developments in the United States and the United Kingdom while also exploring how attitudes towards female husbands shifted in relation to transformations in gender politics and women's rights, ultimately leading to the demise of the category of 'female husband' in the early twentieth century. Groundbreaking and influential, Female Husbands offers a dynamic, varied, and complex history of the LGBTQ past.
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