View Category: Activism/Politics

Photo Name/Description Status
Image Against Equality: Queer Revolution, Not Mere Inclusion
(280 Pages) When “rights” go wrong. Does gay marriage support the right-wing goal of linking access to basic human rights like health care and economic security to an inherently conservative tradition?Will the ability of queers to fight in wars of imperialism help liberate and empower LGBT people around the world?Does hate-crime legislation affirm and strengthen historically anti-queer institutions like the police and prisons rather than dismantling them? The Against Equality collective asks some hard questions. These queer thinkers, writers, and artists are committed to undermining a stunted conception of “equality.” In this powerful book, they challenge mainstream gay and lesbian struggles for inclusion in elitist and inhumane institutions. More than a critique,Against Equality seeks to reinvigorate the queer political imagination with fantastic possibility!
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Image Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith
(354 Pages) Reveals a remarkable woman’s life and her contributions to social justice movements related to Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism. As an organizer, writer, publisher, scholar-activist, and elected official, Barbara Smith has played key roles in multiple social justice movements, including Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism. Her four decades of grassroots activism forged collaborations that introduced the idea that oppression must be fought on a variety of fronts simultaneously, including gender, race, class, and sexuality. By combining hard-to-find historical documents with new unpublished interviews with fellow activists, this book uncovers the deep roots of today’s “identity politics” and “intersectionality” and serves as an essential primer for practicing solidarity and resistance. “Barbara Smith is a creator of modern feminism as a writer, organizer, editor, publisher, and scholar. Now she has added to her decades as an activist outside the system by becoming an elected official who truly listens, represents, and creates bridges to a common good. She has shown us that democracy is a seed that can only be planted where we are.” — Gloria Steinem “Barbara Smith is one of the grand pioneering and prophetic voices of our time. Her truth still hurts and heals!” — Cornel West “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around is not a memoir, a biography, nor a reader. It is a reflection and a conversation. It is also a montage of forty years of documents, interviews, and articles that provide useful lessons for social justice work. This book is a tour de force that documents the life’s work of Barbara Smith and the freedom struggles she shaped.” — Duchess Harris, author of Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Obama
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Image Allies at Work: Creating a Lesbian, Gay, Bisexual and Transgender Inclusive Work Environment
(159 Pages) In Allies at Work, Dr. David M. Hall explains the value and importance of creating an equitable work environment for all people regardless of sexual orientation or gender identity/expression. Dr. Hall carefully explains the business rationale for developing a strong allies program, the requisite steps to develop such a program, and the cultural competency necessary to properly understand the impact of the closet.
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Image Amazon to Zami: Towards a Global Lesbian Feminism
(171 Pages) This work explores the existence of a global network of lesbian activists in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Individual chapters place lesbian concerns in the context of national politics and prevailing attitudes toward women and sexuality, in countries as culturally, politically and economically diverse as Costa Rica, Mexico, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Argentina. A wide range of women debate their ability to be politically active and openly lesbian in countries that are (at best) hostile to the issues of homosexuality and feminism.
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Image And the Band Played on: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
(640 Pages) An examination of the AIDS crisis exposes the federal government for its inaction, health authorities for their greed, and scientists for their desire for prestige in the face of the AIDS pandemic
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Image And the Band Played on: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
(640 Pages) An examination of the AIDS crisis exposes the federal government for its inaction, health authorities for their greed, and scientists for their desire for prestige in the face of the AIDS pandemic
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Image Beautiful Music for Ugly Children
(271 Pages) The award-winning author of The Sky Always Hears Me and the Hills Don't Mind presents the story of teen DJ Gabe, a transgendered youth who knows himself to be a boy trapped in a girl's body and whose efforts to gain acceptance are threatened by a violent gang of bullies. Original.
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Image Come Out Fighting: A Century of Essential Writing on Gay and Lesbian Liberation
(336 Pages) An anthology of important works on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues from U.S. independent and progressive journals includes contributions by Gabriel Rotello, Andrew Kopkind, Pat Califia, and Susie Bright. Original.
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Image Coming Out Under Fire
(384 Pages) Among the many histories of fighting men and women in World War II, little has been written about the thousands of homosexuals who found themselves fighting two wars--one for their country, the other for their own survival as targets of a military policy that sought their discharge as "undesirables." To write this long overdue chapter of American history, Allan Bérubé spent ten years interviewing gay and lesbian veterans, unearthed hundreds of wartime letters between gay GIs, and obtained thousands of pages of newly declassified government documents. While some gay and lesbian soldiers collapsed under the fear of being arrested, interrogated, discharged, and publicly humiliated, many drew strength from deep wartime friendships. Relying on their own secret culture of slang, body language, and "camp" to find each other and build spontaneous communities, they learned, both on and off the battlefield, to be proud of their contribution and of who they were.--From publisher description.
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Image Conduct Unbecoming: Lesbians and Gays in the U.S. Military : Vietnam to the Persian Gulf
(784 Pages) There is a country where citizens are interrogated for long hours and threatened with prison or the loss of their children if they do not cooperate, where citizens are ordered to denounce others, to give information - often entirely fabricated - dispatching people to ignominy and jail. And if they refuse, they are threatened with prison. This country is America, and the subjects under attack are people who have chosen to serve their nation. They are military personnel. They are lesbians and gay men. And they are hunted day in and day out. Author Randy Shilts follows his best-seller And the Band Played On with a book of even greater power and sweep, as he investigates the situation of lesbians and gays in the military over the past three decades, revealing for the first time that some of the most celebrated soldiers in American history were homosexual (including the Father of the United States Army). Five years of interviews with nearly 1,100 gay service people have uncovered extraordinary stories of heroism, persecution, and increasing resistance while documenting the creation of a vast gay subculture within the armed forces. With thousands of documents obtained through the Freedom of Information Act, Shilts offers the first in-depth look at the behind-the-scenes decision-making that resulted in the fierce purges of gays in the military over the past thirty years. With its epic scope this book will provide the basis of a national debate not only on the issue of lesbians and gays in the military but on the broader issue of the place of homosexuals in American life.
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Image Courting Equality: A Documentary History of America's First Legal Same-sex Marriages
(190 Pages) The inspiring story of America's only successful battle for gay marriage—the court cases, the protests, and finally, the weddings! On November 18, 2003, the Massachusetts Supreme Judicial Court granted equal marriage benefits to same-sex couples. The decision provoked a searing public debate over the meaning of marriage and family, civil rights, and the role of religion in law and society. But the experiment went forward nonetheless: thousands of Massachusetts gays and lesbians married and, remarkably, the sky did not fall. Through engaging storytelling and powerful photographs, Courting Equality takes readers through the volatile public debate following the decision and introduces some of the many lesbian and gay families who have taken advantage of equal marriage laws. In Massachusetts, equal marriage has not destroyed the family but rather has reinforced the importance of love, commitment, fairness, and equality to the functioning of healthy democratic communities. A former professor of English and Women's Studies, Patricia A. Gozemba is the coauthor of Pockets of Hope: How Students and Teachers Change the World. She is also a founding member of The History Project, which has been documenting LGBT Boston since 1980. The former editor of Sojourner: The Women's Forum, Karen Kahn also edited Frontline Feminism: Essays from Sojourner's First Twenty Years. Gozemba and Kahn got married in September 2005; they live in Salem, Massachusetts. "Courting Equality offers timely and vivid testimony to the power of commitment. Gozemba and Kahn take great care in tracing the complex legal and legislative processes that resulted in the first legal same-sex weddings. These fascinating behind-the-scenes stories are valuable reminders that the profound historic events surrounding the Goodridge case were played out on an intimate, human scale, in the lives of real families. Marilyn Humphries' photographs are a gift to us all. They provide moving and eloquent documentation of each stage in the struggle to end discrimination in the Massachusetts marriage statutes. Courting Equality bears witness to the determination, the love, and, ultimately, the jubilation of thousands of ordinary people who believed in an extraordinary dream." —Rev. William G. Sinkford, President of the Unitarian Universalist Association of Congregations "In Courting Equality, Marilyn Humphries' stunning photos show both what the struggle for equality looks like and what it feels like. She has been there every step of the way as this history has unfolded. She, Patricia Gozemba, and Karen Kahn have documented an important piece of American history and our national project of expanding fairness and ending discrimination. The more people get to know gay people, the more they support us, our families, and our rights. This book shows how some of our own legislators and fellow citizens got to know us and their journey to embracing fairness. Courting Equality will help others make that journey." —Mary L. Bonauto, Gay & Lesbian Advocates & Defenders, Lead counsel, Goodridge v. Department of Public Health "Courting Equality is a very important book on several levels. First, it chronicles the events that led up to same sex marriage in Massachusetts, an historic event in our country's move towards making the wonderful principles of the Constitution applicable to all of our citizens. Second, it shows how political support in the elected Legislature grew rapidly as the reality of allowing same sex couples to love each other demolished the prejudices that prevented same sex marriage previously. Finally, it reinforces the point—which was no surprise to those of us fighting for equal treatment for all people—that same sex marriage has been an entirely positive thing for thousands of men and women in Massachusetts, and has had zero negative consequences at all. Too often, political literature focuses on the bad news, Courting Equality tells some very good news very well." —Congressman Barney Frank "Courting Equality is a remarkable chronicle of exactly how social change happens. Marilyn Humpries'vivid photographic documentation of the fight for same-sex marriage hardly needs any elaboration, but Kahn's and Gozemba's accompanying legal history is riveting. Words and pictures together create a moving, human portrait of representative democracy at work." —Alison Bechdel, author of Fun Home and Dykes to Watch Out For "Hopefully, MassEquality or some other such group will also distribute a copy of Beacon Press's newly published Courting Equality: A Documentary History of America's First Legal Same-Sex Marriage to every lawmaker. The book is an elegantly moving and gorgeously illustrated account of the battle for civil marriage rights here in Massachusetts." —Bay Windows, book mention in the May 3rd issue "For gay marriage boosters, to read "Courting Equality" is a literary experience of sheer ecstasy, a brief pause of unbridled joy in the ongoing - and by no means over - struggle to preserve and protect same-sex marriage. It's a delightful sneak peak over the rainbow." —In Newsweekly "The pictures of protests and rallies—both the pro and anti-forces swarming with energy—make you feel like you're witnessing a combination of the American Revolution and a sizzling Red Sox game. Marginalized no more, these gay couples (in both senses of the word) are photographed goin' to the chapel, hugging kids, looking joyful, homey, even rather Hallmark mainstream—at last." —Improper Bostonian Marilyn Humphries is an independent photojournalist whose work over the past twenty-five years has appeared in numerous publications, ranging from the New York Times and The Pro g ressive to Bay Windows, Gay Community News, and the Boston Phoenix. She lives in Beverly, Massachusetts.
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Image Created Equal: Why Gay Rights Matter to America
(175 Pages) Why should Americans who are not gay care about gay rights? In Created Equal, Michael Nava and Robert Dawidoff argue that the movement for gay equality is central to the continuing defense of individual liberty in America. Beginning with an examination of the determined assault on gay issues by the religious right, the authors show how this sectarian movement to legislate private religious morality into law undermines the purpose of American constitutional government: the protection of the individual's right to determine how best to live his or her life. The book starts from the premise that gay and lesbians are, first and foremost, American citizens, and then looks to what rights belong to every individual American citizen, arguing from the Declaration of Independence and the Constitution. Addressing their argument to the great majority of their fellow Americans, Dawidoff and Nava emphasize that what is at stake is not the fate of the gay community, but the future of constitutional principle and the rights of free individuals in American society.
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Image Creating a Place for Ourselves: Lesbian, Gay, and Bisexual Community Histories
(300 Pages) Creating a Place For Ourselves is a groundbreaking collection of essays that examines gay life in the United States before Stonewall and the gay liberation movement. Along with examining areas with large gay communities such as New York, San Francisco and Fire Island, the contributors also consider the thriving gay populations in cities like Detroit, Buffalo, Washington, D.C., Birmingham and Flint, demonstrating that gay communities are truly everywhere. Contributors: Brett Beemyn, Nan Alamilla Boyd, George Chauncey, Madeline Davis, Allen Drexel, John Howard, David Johnson, Liz Kennedy, Joan Nestle, Esther Newton, Tim Retzloff, Marc Stein, Roey Thorpe.
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Image Dishonorable Passions: Sodomy Laws in America, 1861-2003
(514 Pages) A history of the government's regulation of sexual behavior traces the historical purposes behind the prohibition against sodomy in early America and continues with a discussion of how the law was referenced in different contexts in later years, covering such topics as the McCarthy era, the sexual revolution of the 1960s, and the 2003 Supreme Court decision to decriminalize private sex between consenting adults. 20,000 first printing.
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Image Drag King Dreams
(302 Pages) A follow-up to Stone Butch Blues finds East Village bouncer-turned-bartender Max Rabinowitz struggling through a mid-life crisis in the aftermath of the September 11 attacks, experiencing outrage at the wars in the Middle East, and rediscovering her activist spirit after the death of a cross-dresser friend. Original.
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Image Eating Fire - My Life As A Lesbian Avenger Available for Checkout
Image El género en disputa: el feminismo y la subversión de la identidad
(316 Pages) Judith Butler es una de las feministas de referencia en el panorama filosófico actual y El género en disputa es un texto indispensable para el movimiento feminista. El género en disputa, obra fundadora de la llamada teoría queer y emblema de los estudios de género como se conocen hoy en día, es un volumen indispensable para comprender la teoría feminista actual: constituye una lúcida crítica a la idea esencialista de que las identidades de género son inmutables y encuentran su arraigo en la naturaleza, en el cuerpo o en una heterosexualidad normativa y obligatoria. Libro interdisciplinario que se inscribe simultáneamente en la filosofía, la antropología, la teoría literaria y el psicoanálisis, este texto es deudor de un prolongado acercamiento de la autora al feminismo teórico, a los debates sobre el carácter socialmente construido del género, al psicoanálisis, a los estudios pioneros sobre el travestismo, y también a su activa participación en movimientos defensores de la diversidad sexual. Así, con un pie en la academia y otro en la militancia, apoyada en su lectura de autores como Jacques Lacan, Sigmund Freud, Simone de Beauvoir, Claude Lévi-Strauss, Luce Irigaray, Julia Kristeva, Monique Wittig y Michel Foucault, Butler ofrece aquí una teoría original, polémica y desde luego subversiva, responsable ella misma de más de una disputa.
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Image Epistemology of the Closet: Updated with a New Preface
(258 Pages) Since the late 1980s, queer studies and theory have become vital to the intellectual and political life of the United States. This has been due, in no small degree, to the influence of Eve Kosofsky Sedgwick's critically acclaimed Epistemology of the Closet. Working from classic texts of European and American writers—including Melville, James, Nietzsche, Proust, and Wilde—Sedgwick analyzes a turn-of-the-century historical moment in which sexual orientation became as important a demarcation of personhood as gender had been for centuries. In her preface to this updated edition Sedgwick places the book both personally and historically, looking specifically at the horror of the first wave of the AIDS epidemic and its influence on the text.
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Image Excluded: Making Feminist and Queer Movements More Inclusive
(336 Pages) While many feminist and queer movements are designed to challenge sexism, they often simultaneously police gender and sexuality—sometimes just as fiercely as the straight, male-centric mainstream does. Among LGBTQ activists, there is a long history of lesbians and gay men dismissing bisexuals, transgender people, and other gender and sexual minorities. In each case, exclusion is based on the premise that certain ways of being gendered or sexual are more legitimate, natural, or righteous than others. As a trans woman, bisexual, and femme activist, Julia Serano has spent much of the last ten years challenging various forms of exclusion within feminist and queer/LGBTQ movements. In Excluded, she chronicles many of these instances of exclusion and argues that marginalizing others often stems from a handful of assumptions that are routinely made about gender and sexuality. These false assumptions infect theories, activism, organizations, and communities—and worse, they enable people to vigorously protest certain forms of sexism while simultaneously ignoring and even perpetuating others. Serano advocates for a new approach to fighting sexism that avoids these pitfalls and offers new ways of thinking about gender, sexuality, and sexism that foster inclusivity rather than exclusivity.
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Image Exile & Pride: Disability, Queerness & Liberation
(186 Pages) Rev. ed. of: Exile and pride: disability, queerness, and liberation. 1999.
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Image Fifty Ways to Support Lesbian and Gay Equality
(165 Pages) A call to action for anyone interested in supporting gay rights in America presents essays on how to make activism a part of everyday life, fighting discrimination in families, communities, and the workplace. Original.
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Image Flagrant Conduct: The Story of Lawrence V. Texas
(345 Pages) Provides a detailed legal history and examines the motives of all players involved with the landmark Supreme Court gay rights case that protected consenting adults' rights, regardless of sexual preference, in the bedroom. 20,000 first printing.
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