View Category: History

Photo Name/Description Status
Image A Desired Past: A Short History of Same-Sex Love in America
(232 Pages) A fascinating tour of same-sex love across four centuries of American history begins with European observations of native sexual practices when they arrived on American shores and chronicles a wide array of alternative behaviors.
Available for Checkout
Image A History of Bisexuality
(281 Pages) Why is bisexuality the object of such skepticism? Why do sexologists steer clear of it in their research? Why has bisexuality, in stark contrast to homosexuality, only recently emerged as a nascent political and cultural identity? Bisexuality has been rendered as mostly irrelevant to the history, theory, and politics of sexuality. With A History of Bisexuality, Steven Angelides explores the reasons why, and invites us to rethink our preconceptions about sexual identity. Retracing the evolution of sexology, and revisiting modern epistemological categories of sexuality in psychoanalysis, gay liberation, social constructionism, queer theory, biology, and human genetics, Angelides argues that bisexuality has historically functioned as the structural other to sexual identity itself, undermining assumptions about heterosexuality and homosexuality. In a book that will become the center of debate about the nature of sexuality for years to come, A History of Bisexuality compels us to rethink contemporary discourses of sexual theory and politics.
Available for Checkout
Image A Queer Reader
(373 Pages) A Queer Reader is a rich collection of quotes and short excerpts about the gay experience through the centuries, from Plato to Andy Warhol. Arranged chronologically and drawing on sources from Michelangelo's sonnets to a speech in the House of Lords, from graphic graffiti found in Pompeii to a Playboy interview with David Bowie, A Queer Reader presents gay history as never before.
Available for Checkout
Image About Time: Exploring the Gay Past
(505 Pages) This is a collection of documentary material and a selection of previously uncollected essays, speeches and reviews by the historian and gay activist, Martin Duberman. Part One contains rare documents from the past two centuries tracing the lives and opinions of both our gay and our homosexual ancestors. Part Two has been extensively revised and includes six new articles published as recently as 1991, covering such topics as coming out, bisexuality in the ancient world and reform in the gay rights movement.
Available for Checkout
Image after stonewall Available for Checkout
Image Ain't Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around: Forty Years of Movement Building with Barbara Smith
(354 Pages) Reveals a remarkable woman’s life and her contributions to social justice movements related to Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism. As an organizer, writer, publisher, scholar-activist, and elected official, Barbara Smith has played key roles in multiple social justice movements, including Civil Rights, feminism, lesbian and gay liberation, anti-racism, and Black feminism. Her four decades of grassroots activism forged collaborations that introduced the idea that oppression must be fought on a variety of fronts simultaneously, including gender, race, class, and sexuality. By combining hard-to-find historical documents with new unpublished interviews with fellow activists, this book uncovers the deep roots of today’s “identity politics” and “intersectionality” and serves as an essential primer for practicing solidarity and resistance. “Barbara Smith is a creator of modern feminism as a writer, organizer, editor, publisher, and scholar. Now she has added to her decades as an activist outside the system by becoming an elected official who truly listens, represents, and creates bridges to a common good. She has shown us that democracy is a seed that can only be planted where we are.” — Gloria Steinem “Barbara Smith is one of the grand pioneering and prophetic voices of our time. Her truth still hurts and heals!” — Cornel West “Ain’t Gonna Let Nobody Turn Me Around is not a memoir, a biography, nor a reader. It is a reflection and a conversation. It is also a montage of forty years of documents, interviews, and articles that provide useful lessons for social justice work. This book is a tour de force that documents the life’s work of Barbara Smith and the freedom struggles she shaped.” — Duchess Harris, author of Black Feminist Politics from Kennedy to Obama
Available for Checkout
Image Amazon to Zami: Towards a Global Lesbian Feminism
(171 Pages) This work explores the existence of a global network of lesbian activists in Latin America, the Caribbean, Africa, Asia and the Pacific. Individual chapters place lesbian concerns in the context of national politics and prevailing attitudes toward women and sexuality, in countries as culturally, politically and economically diverse as Costa Rica, Mexico, South Africa, Zimbabwe and Argentina. A wide range of women debate their ability to be politically active and openly lesbian in countries that are (at best) hostile to the issues of homosexuality and feminism.
Checked Out
Image American Studies
(275 Pages) A witty look at gay life over the last fifty years focuses on Reeve, a hospitalized sixty-two-year-old gay man, who thinks back to his college years and his troubled relationship with famed literary scholar Tom Slater. A first novel. Tour.
Available for Checkout
Image An Underground Life: The Memoirs of a Gay Jew in Nazi Berlin
(176 Pages) That a Jew living in Nazi Berlin survived the Holocaust at all is surprising. That he was a homosexual and a teenage leader in the resistance and yet survived is amazing. But that he endured the ongoing horror with an open heart, with love and without vitriol, and has written about it so beautifully is truly miraculous. This is Gad Beck's story.
Checked Out
Image And the Band Played on: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
(640 Pages) An examination of the AIDS crisis exposes the federal government for its inaction, health authorities for their greed, and scientists for their desire for prestige in the face of the AIDS pandemic
Available for Checkout
Image And the Band Played on: Politics, People, and the AIDS Epidemic
(640 Pages) An examination of the AIDS crisis exposes the federal government for its inaction, health authorities for their greed, and scientists for their desire for prestige in the face of the AIDS pandemic
Available for Checkout
Image Bashing Back: Wayne Besen on GLBT People, Politics, and Culture
(224 Pages) The Best of Besen! Bashing Back: Wayne Besen on GLBT People, Politics & Culture is a compilation of 72 columns from the outspoken GLBT activist and author of Anything But Straight: Unmasking the Scandals and Lies Behind the Ex-Gay Myth. Funny, provocative, and informative, this unique book puts a progressive spin on hot-button topics in the political, cultural, and social arenas, covering everything from AIDS and African-Americans to Zach Stark. Bashing Back presents an A-to-Z look at Besen's worldview on a wide range of topics, including Bill O'Reilly, Brokeback Mountain, Ellen DeGeneres, gay pride parades, marriage rights, Mary Cheney, overhauling the gay movement, religion and politics, sports and homophobia, The Passion of the Christ, the pitiful state of TV news, the Vatican's war on gays, the World Trade Center, and New Orleans. Smart and funny, Besen delivers a knockout punch to the notion that liberalism stands for nothing and progressive means passive. From the author: “The columns I have chosen for this book touch on politics and people, comedy and culture. But most of all, they are a strong defense of the liberal values that have made this nation strong. It is time we proudly stand up for what we believe in. If we don't defend our values, our opponents will define them. . . . Bashing Back is the first punch in a fight to take back our culture and restore progressive values for the good of the nation.” An excerpt from “Bill O'Reilly:” Once upon a time I actually enjoyed The O'Reilly Factor. While I almost always disagreed with him, he was at least entertaining. Lately, however, he has morphed into just another Bush mouthpiece. The master of the “No Spin Zone” is suddenly spinning so hard he is in the Twilight Zone, dizzy in his own deception. He even had the audacity on CNBC to suggest that Fox isn't a conservative news outlet. That's beyond spin. If it were closer to Hanukah I'd think O'Reilly was a dreidel. My other problem with his show is that it's unnaturally obsessed with gay issues. More gay people appear on The O'Reilly Factor than on Showtime's Queer as Folk. I know that sounds strange coming from a gay columnist who has twice appeared on his show. But it seems like he's had on every gay person in America to use as his personal political piñata. When even gay activists are tired of watching gay segments, it's time to find a new culture war issue. Bashing Back is an invaluable compilation of Besen's best columns from Planet Out, Gay.com, and the Washington Blade. It's an essential resource for longtime Besen readers and an entertaining introduction for newcomers.
Available for Checkout
Image Beautiful Bottom, Beautiful Shame: Where “Black” Meets “Queer”
(271 Pages) DIVThe relationship between black queer subjects and debasement as portrayed within popular culture texts and films./div
Available for Checkout
Image Becoming Visible: An Illustrated History of Lesbian and Gay Life in Twentieth-century America
(282 Pages) Captures the lesbian and gay struggle for equal rights
Available for Checkout
Image Black on Both Sides: A Racial History of Trans Identity
(256 Pages) The story of Christine Jorgensen, America's first prominent transsexual, famously narrated trans embodiment in the postwar era. Her celebrity, however, has obscured other mid-century trans narratives--ones lived by African Americans such as Lucy Hicks Anderson and James McHarris. Their erasure from trans history masks the profound ways race has figured prominently in the construction and representation of transgender subjects. In Black on Both Sides, C. Riley Snorton identifies multiple intersections between blackness and transness from the mid-nineteenth century to present-day anti-black and anti-trans legislation and violence. Drawing on a deep and varied archive of materials--early sexological texts, fugitive slave narratives, Afro-modernist literature, sensationalist journalism, Hollywood films--Snorton attends to how slavery and the production of racialized gender provided the foundations for an understanding of gender as mutable. In tracing the twinned genealogies of blackness and transness, Snorton follows multiple trajectories, from the medical experiments conducted on enslaved black women by J. Marion Sims, the "father of American gynecology," to the negation of blackness that makes transnormativity possible. Revealing instances of personal sovereignty among blacks living in the antebellum North that were mapped in terms of "cross dressing" and canonical black literary works that express black men's access to the "female within," Black on Both Sides concludes with a reading of the fate of Phillip DeVine, who was murdered alongside Brandon Teena in 1993, a fact omitted from the film Boys Don't Cry out of narrative convenience. Reconstructing these theoretical and historical trajectories furthers our imaginative capacities to conceive more livable black and trans worlds.
Available for Checkout
Image Black Queer Studies: A Critical Anthology
(393 Pages) While over the past decade a number of scholars have done significant work on questions of black lesbian, gay, bisexual, and transgendered identities, this volume is the first to collect this groundbreaking work and make black queer studies visible as a developing field of study in the United States. Bringing together essays by established and emergent scholars, this collection assesses the strengths and weaknesses of prior work on race and sexuality and highlights the theoretical and political issues at stake in the nascent field of black queer studies. Including work by scholars based in English, film studies, black studies, sociology, history, political science, legal studies, cultural studies, and performance studies, the volume showcases the broadly interdisciplinary nature of the black queer studies project. The contributors consider representations of the black queer body, black queer literature, the pedagogical implications of black queer studies, and the ways that gender and sexuality have been glossed over in black studies and race and class marginalized in queer studies. Whether exploring the closet as a racially loaded metaphor, arguing for the inclusion of diaspora studies in black queer studies, considering how the black lesbian voice that was so expressive in the 1970s and 1980s is all but inaudible today, or investigating how the social sciences have solidified racial and sexual exclusionary practices, these insightful essays signal an important and necessary expansion of queer studies. Contributors. Bryant K. Alexander, Devon Carbado, Faedra Chatard Carpenter, Keith Clark, Cathy Cohen, Roderick A. Ferguson, Jewelle Gomez, Phillip Brian Harper, Mae G. Henderson, Sharon P. Holland, E. Patrick Johnson, Kara Keeling, Dwight A. McBride, Charles I. Nero, Marlon B. Ross, Rinaldo Walcott, Maurice O. Wallace
Available for Checkout
Image Bodies in Doubt: An American History of Intersex
(240 Pages) Bodies in Doubt breaks new ground in examining the historical roots of modern attitudes about intersex in the United States and will interest scholars and researchers in disability studies, social history, gender studies, and the history of medicine.
Available for Checkout
Image Boy-Wives Available for Checkout
Image Boy-Wives and Female-Husbands: Studies in African Homosexualities
(358 Pages) An incisive study of homosexuality in traditional and modern African cultures challenges the idea of African-American heterosexuality in a collection of essays that discuss woman-woman marriages, male homosexuality in West Africa, alternative gender identities among the Swahili, and homosexual portrayals in contemporary African literature. Original.
Available for Checkout
Image Charity and Sylvia: A Same-sex Marriage in Early America
(267 Pages) Charity and Sylvia is the intimate history of the extraordinary marriage of two ordinary early American women. Their story, drawn from the women's personal writings and other original documents, reveals that same-sex marriage is not as new as we think.
Available for Checkout
Image Chloe Plus Olivia: An Anthology of Lesbian Literature from the Seventeenth Century to the Present
(812 Pages) A collection of the works of four centuries of lesbian and bisexual writers reviews the shifting concept of "lesbian literature" by exploring six different genres
Available for Checkout
Image chronicle of a plague Available for Checkout
Image Chronicle of a Plague, Revisited: AIDS and Its Aftermath
(264 Pages) Discusses the AIDS epidemic in the 1980s, emphasizing the impact the epidemic had on the gay male population in New York City, and the sudden resurgence of AIDS cases in that same community today.
Available for Checkout
Image Come Out Fighting: A Century of Essential Writing on Gay and Lesbian Liberation
(336 Pages) An anthology of important works on gay, lesbian, bisexual, and transgender issues from U.S. independent and progressive journals includes contributions by Gabriel Rotello, Andrew Kopkind, Pat Califia, and Susie Bright. Original.
Available for Checkout
Image Coming Out Under Fire
(384 Pages) Among the many histories of fighting men and women in World War II, little has been written about the thousands of homosexuals who found themselves fighting two wars--one for their country, the other for their own survival as targets of a military policy that sought their discharge as "undesirables." To write this long overdue chapter of American history, Allan Bérubé spent ten years interviewing gay and lesbian veterans, unearthed hundreds of wartime letters between gay GIs, and obtained thousands of pages of newly declassified government documents. While some gay and lesbian soldiers collapsed under the fear of being arrested, interrogated, discharged, and publicly humiliated, many drew strength from deep wartime friendships. Relying on their own secret culture of slang, body language, and "camp" to find each other and build spontaneous communities, they learned, both on and off the battlefield, to be proud of their contribution and of who they were.--From publisher description.
Available for Checkout